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Question About SoftRaid Manual: Certifying Disk In Mac.....

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(@guitarflex)
Eminent Member

Middle of night epiphany to spare at least some embarrassment (on second thought, perhaps too late for that!). The issue with the clone not being bootable now makes sense. The P12 volume that I setup in SoftRaid is HFS+ and I failed to take note that the article very specifically says the standard backup needs to be on an APFS volume in order for that backup to become bootable ("If your data-only backup resides on a non-encrypted APFS volume, you can install macOS onto the backup disk to make it bootable.") I'll hit this fresh again tomorrow and sort it out. I assume that's also why the notification shown in the picture above showed up when I tried to install it to the external SSD. 

It has come to my attention that SoftRaid 6.1 adds APFS. As I am currently behind on version 6.03, of course I need to update my SoftRaid, but I guess now I'll be updating everything and hopefully never getting this far out into outer space ever again. I have learned a lot in the process, at least 

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Topic starter Posted : 13/08/2022 2:21 am
(@softraid-support)
Member Admin

@guitarflex 

I thought I mentioned you cannot install Catalina onto a SoftRAID volume. And, SoftRAID volumes are not bootable any longer.

With newer OS's, no RAID can be bootable, including Apple's.

It is sometimes possible to make a SoftRAID 5 volume bootable by cloning Catalina, but difficult and I don't recommend you try.

Stick to normal startup volumes and back up your data.

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Posted : 13/08/2022 3:42 pm
(@softraid-support)
Member Admin

@guitarflex 

And, upgrade SoftRAID to 6.3. SoftRAID is a disk driver, so keep it up to date. Good luck!

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Posted : 13/08/2022 3:47 pm
(@guitarflex)
Eminent Member

Helpful to know, thanks. We have enough of a major step forward now that all signs point towards a smooth transition. I got a bootable backup at last (tested, confirmed). I'm a guitar player who essentially doesn't care about technology and has had to learn a bunch of it for a video production launch. In any event, I had no idea before this why my CCC Backups used to be bootable on my 2015 MBP (I went El Capitan through Mojave on that machine with no T2 chip and remember I used to just format a Mac OS Extended volume in Disk Utility and CCC took care of the rest. Since getting new computers, for the past year I had been befuddled on why my CCC backups all appeared to be data backups. This is how out of the loop I was. No idea that the drive had to be APFS to become bootable).

Also got a 64GB USB-C memory stick and certified it three passes over (passed), since I intend to create a bootable installer and run a fresh install when I finally do this. Also spoke with AppleCare so I'm in much better shape this far in at least, and still feel like it's taught me too much to regret any of it.

The only thing that still isn't entirely clear to me doesn't really matter since you told me there's no real need to certify the internal disk anyhow, but if I were so inclined to keep piddling away days on research, surely at this stage I could safely conduct an experiment on the (currently bootable) backup (but I don't really want to initiate a certification of a 4TB drive that arrived from OWC pre-certified, so I'm not going to). I suppose I could just delete the backup volume and try to install the OS onto the blank backup drive in Recovery Mode to simulate the experience and then maybe it would all make sense to me once and for all. 

What I'm still not sure of is how the process would look in actual practice. What I  "think" after all of this....is that I'd just load Disk Utility, select the blank drive (which would contain no containers because it would contain no file system format with no volumes at all on it post-certification), hit "Erase," give it a name (like Mac HD) and select it to be APFS, which would allow me to reload the macOS onto it. But it's still not clear to me if the second container (the Data container) would be created automatically upon installation of the operating system.

In any event, we're talking about a new MBP from Jan. 2021 with no indication of or concern for drive issues, so of course there's no need for me to really do this. But understanding is enough for me sometimes. I'd rather understand more and accomplish less than accomplish more and understand less. To a fault at times (as evidenced by Day 4 of something that most people would have just installed from the Finder and moved on with their lives). 

This post was modified 4 months ago by GuitarFlex
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Topic starter Posted : 13/08/2022 8:06 pm
(@softraid-support)
Member Admin

@guitarflex 

WHen installing the OS, macOS automatically creates the data volume, nothing for you to do.

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Posted : 13/08/2022 8:25 pm
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